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The Ottawa Centre is comprised of about 90 CMOS members. The Centre holds monthly meetings downtown from September through May.  Our meetings are open to members and the public.  Meetings start with lunch followed by a presentation by an invited speaker and discussion. Occasionally our meetings are joint with partner groups or societies.  About every ten years, the Ottawa Centre hosts the annual CMOS Congress.

Outreach activities aimed at high school, university and post graduate students are a priority for the Ottawa Centre. We judge and provide prizes at regional science fairs in Ottawa and Gatineau.

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Upcoming Luncheon Meeting - Wednesday 26 April 2017


SPEAKER: Dr. Richard Dewey, Ocean Networks Canada, University of Victoria, CMOS Tour Speaker

TITLE: Pacific Anomalies: Oscillations, El Nino, and The Blob

ABSTRACT:  The Pacific Ocean has exhibited a number of major anomalies during the last few years, generally responding to large scale atmospheric patterns. Some of these patterns have been seen before, including the Pacific Oscillation dating back over nearly a century. However, recent occurrences have been detected under the shadow of climate change and in the presence of enhanced observing and forecast systems. Our ability to detect, characterize, and correlate these patterns continues to advance, while our ability to predict and understand the causes and linkages remains somewhat limited. In this overview of major events dating from 2012 through to the end of 2016, we will piece together some of the puzzle, or puzzles, peculiar to the northeast Pacific to reveal what we know and don't know about this critical region.

PLACE
Rideau  Canal Junior Ranks Mess, 4 Queen Elizabeth Drive, Ottawa.  Side entrance, Harmony Room, 4th floor (elevator available)

COST:  $25 non members; $20 members & their spouses; students $10

TIME 12:00 noon, Wednesday 26 April 2017

MENU:  salmon, green beans and scalloped potatoes with lemon meringue pie for dessert


PARKING:  On street parking in the vicinity

RSVP:  Please confirm your attendance by Friday 21 April 2017 by Doodle (click here)

Alternatively, please contact any of the following to be added to our list, or if you have problems with Doodle:

Martin Gauthier 613-730 7608 ext 2520; email: martin.gauthier@rwdi.com
Ann McMillan 613-831-5851; email: mcmillan@storm.ca
Paul Pestieau 613-990-6855; email:  Paul.Pestieau@canada.ca
Bob Jones 613-820-6336; email:  jonesb@ncf.ca
Daria Bradbury 613-949-9119; email:  Daria.Bradbury@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
Hoy Chow 819-938-4429; email:  hoy.chow@canada.ca

Tom Zagon: 613-992-8431; email:  tom.zagon@canada.ca

CANCELLATION:  If you need to cancel, please change your Doodle information as soon as
possible or let a contact person know so we can cancel your food order.

NEXT MEETING:  late May 2017 details tba


 

The Canadian Association for the Club of Rome (CACOR) (collaborator with CMOS Ottawa)

CACOR cordially invites you to a Luncheon

Title: Global Warming Impacts, Interventions, Consequences, Costs, and Implications

Date: Wednesday April 12th 2017

Speaker: Alan Emery

Time: 12-2pm

Place: Army Officers' Mess, 149 Somerset Street West, Ottawa

Cost:  $25 general admission; $20 for members, their spouses and student guests. The downstairs ante-room and dining area will be open at 11:30 for those who wish to meet and greet friends and colleagues prior to lunch.

Please confirm attendance by replying to this e-mail on or before Monday April 10th. Please remember that CACOR is responsible for payment of guests who have registered. If you register and need to change your commitment, please inform us as well before Monday April 10th. Thank you for your assistance in this matter. We unfortunately will follow up with an invoice for those who were not able to honour their commitment.

In order to accommodate all members, associates and guests please indicate your presence to this event as soon as possible. Please indicate as well your dietary needs. The Mess can prepare alternative for either vegetarian or vegan meals.

About the presentation:

Recent global warming is the result of a range of human activities. By examining the climates in the geological past as proxy observations of real events, we can describe what we can expect future climates to be like based on both the past observations and any changes we decide to make. From those observation-based descriptions, we can deduce the conditions we will face in the near-term and long-term future. What can we realistically do to manage the future climate and thus limit the damage to future generations? Can we afford it?

I will discuss the basics of global warming, offering some easily understood evidence to confirm that the recent warming is indeed the result of human activities and not some natural phenomenon.  I will explain the methods we have used and the results we get when we investigate the near-term and long-term effectiveness of potential intervention scenarios.

Essentially delay is a very bad idea. Our interventions must eliminate not only our own excess carbon emissions, they must also remove nearly one quarter of the carbon that is now in the atmosphere in order to return to pre-industrial norms and stabilize the climate.

Once we understand the long-term consequences of our near-term actions, we can begin to define the critically important elements to tackle first - the most obvious being our energy sources. Is the end-game - saving humanity - within the realm of possible? If so how much will it cost and for what specific benefits? The answers will surprise you, may dismay you, and yet will provide hope for the future.

About the speaker:

Alan Emery

My research career focussed on marine biology using various diving techniques in the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, and Indian Oceans with an emphasis on systematics, evolution and ecology. I have seen the gradual changes - especially in coral reef ecology - that are the direct result of global warming. A combination of increasing temperature, increasing acidity, shifting distribution of marine organisms, and declining relationships in corals with their algal symbionts has caused extensive coral bleaching and invasion by sponges and macro algae, which in turn destabilizes the ecology of the reef. I have also worked in the Arctic both underwater and on the land, so have watched the relatively rapid changes in Arctic environments as well. As an undergraduate I carried out the first biological surveys of the Douglas Point nuclear plant, so that has meant a continuing interest and involvement in nuclear energy. I was part of the team developing the energy policy for Ontario in the early 1970s (including siting of nuclear plants) and worked with the International Joint Commission on oil transport and pollution in the Great Lakes. One fun adventure was kick-starting Canada's Fathom Five underwater park in Lake Huron/Georgian Bay. I spent ten years as a professor at the University of Toronto and a Curator at the Royal Ontario Museum carrying out many expeditions around the world. While President of the Canadian Museum of Nature (CMN) from 1983 to 1996, I was active in Canada's role in developing the 1992 Biodiversity Convention (one of the three including Climate Change and Desertification); hosted sessions in the subsequent several conventions of the parties (COP); and enabled the first country study of biodiversity resources (Canada) which was carried out under the museum's auspices. My experience with "wicked problem" approaches includes the work with the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, leading training sessions at the Banff Centre, bringing stakeholders together (CEOs, government executives, Indigenous Elders, Industry associations, etc.) to resolve legal, cultural, political, and community issues in the north dealing with mining, tar sands, the effects of climate change, and policy development arising from the COP series of meetings.

View Ottawa CACOR Web Site


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Ottawa Science Exchange and Partner Meeting Notices (notices closest to the current date are on top)

Sigma Xi, Companions in Research     

Ottawa Chapter

Meeting and Lecture Tuesday, April 11th, 2017 6:30 pm Central Experimental Farm K. W. Neatby Building,  Salon C

Alan Emery CEO KIVU Nature Inc. will speak on

Global Warming: Impacts,  Interventions,  Consequences,  Costs,  and Implications

Recent global warming is the result of a range of human activities. By examining the climates in the geological past as proxy observations of real events, we can describe what we can expect future climates to be like based on both the past observations and any changes we decide to make. From those observation-based descriptions, we can deduce the conditions we will face in the near-term and long-term future. What can we realistically do to manage the future climate and thus limit the damage to future generations? Can we afford it?

I will discuss the basics of global warming, offering some easily understood evidence to confirm that the recent warming is indeed the result of human activities and not some natural phenomenon.  I will explain the methods we have used and the results we get when we investigate the near-term and long-term effectiveness of potential intervention scenarios.

Essentially delay is a very bad idea. Our interventions must eliminate not only our own excess carbon emissions, they must also remove nearly one quarter of the carbon that is now in the atmosphere in order to return to pre-industrial norms and stabilize the climate.

Once we understand the long-term consequences of our near-term actions, we can begin to define the critically important elements to tackle first - the most obvious being our energy sources. Is the end-game - saving humanity - within the realm of possible? If so how much will it cost and for what specific benefits? The answers will surprise you, may dismay you, and yet will provide hope for the future.

As many of the audience as wish will continue the discussion over supper; no advance notice is necessary.    Guests are always welcome

ΣΞ Ottawa ΣΞ

The Neatby Building stands at the northern boundary of the Central Experimental Farm, roughly across Carling from the Civic Hospital.

To reach the Building from Carling, turn south into the Farm on Maple Drive, at the intersection at the brow of the hill, half way between Preston and Parkdale;  the intersection has traffic lights, and the residential street running north opposite Maple is named Irving Place. An immediate right turn (westward) off Maple will lead into a parking lot, where there is ample free parking after 5 pm, and on to the Neatby Building.  There is some parking on the roadway in front of the building itself, including designated handicapped spots.

Drivers eastbound on Carling may choose, 100 metres before the traffic lights, to turn in directly at the main entrance to the Neatby Building.

Drivers coming through the Farm may turn north from the NCC Scenic Drive onto Maple.

Sigma Xi Ottawa Chapter contact:

Heather Marshall    (613) 733-9423 Bruce Gill    (613) 832-8040  or  scarab57@xplornet.com

ΣΞ


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Ottawa Centre Archives - Please follow this link for past meeting notices, slides from recent lunch presentations, executive members, previous speakers by topic and year, minutes of executive meetings and much more.





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